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TODAY IN KIMBERLEY’S HISTORY – 08 DECEMBER

UPDATE: 08/12/2017

8 DECEMBER 1871, Dutoitspan appointed as the seat of magistracy for Pniel District, 1871.
8 DECEMBER 1877, GW Legislative Council disbanded.
8 DECEMBER 1946, Two men killed when their aeroplane crashes at Kimberley Airport.

DID YOU KNOW

Two Kimberley men, Vernon “Tossie” Goldman and Joseph Nogid, were killed on Sunday 8 December 1946 when the Piper – J – Cub they were in crashed at the Kimberley Aerodrome. (Pictured is a Piper – J – Cub).

The plane was flying low, preparing to make a landing when it went into a spin and crashed. Tossie Goldman, the pilot, died instantly, while Nogid died from his injuries while on the way to hospital.

PT-Piper_J_Cub-1946

Piper J Cub

The 28 year old Goldman was the elder son of Phil and the late Dolly Goldman, Phil being the well-known bookmaker of 33 Currey Street. Educated at Christian Brother’s College he saw service in World War II with firstly, the Kimberley Regiment, and later with 24 Squadron SAAF, reaching the rank of Captain. He had been mentioned in despatches.

He was a member of the Henry B Loch Lodge, the MOTH, the BESL, and the SAAF Association.
Other than his father, he left his younger brother Henry “Buddy” Goldman (serving in the SAAF) and a sister Joy, still at school.

Joseph Nogid, 23 years of age, was educated at SACS in Cape Town, and was an only son. Although employed in Kimberley, his parents lived in Johannesburg.

Nogid was buried in Johannesburg and Goldman in the West End Jewish cemetery.

UPDATE: 08/12/2016

8 DECEMBER 1871, Dutoitspan appointed as the seat of magistracy for Pniel District, 1871.
8 DECEMBER 1877, GW Legislative Council disbanded.
8 DECEMBER 1946, Two men killed when their aeroplane crashes at Kimberley Airport.

DID YOU KNOW

The settlement of Modder River was begun shortly after the railway line reached there in 1885 and by the outbreak of the Anglo-Boer War there were at least six hotels at what had become a weekend destination for Kimberley citizens. One of the big battles of the Anglo-Boer War was also fought at the junction of the Modder and Riet rivers on 28 November 1899 – the Battle of Modder River, or as the Boers called it, the Battle of Two Rivers.

The British army of Lord Methuen camped in the Modder River/Ritchie region from 29 November 1899 until 16 February 1900, although it was used throughout the war as a British outpost.

The village of Ritchie, a farming settlement, was originally called The Rosmead, possibly named after Lord Rosmead (Sir Hercules Robinson). In 1881 John Fraser offered plots for sale for the erection of buildings for what he termed “a retreat” for Kimberley folk, and by October 1889 it was called Rosmead Township. By 1912 the village had been renamed Ritchie – as there was already a Rosmead in the Cape – after the farmer who founded the town, one Hendrik Ritchie. One must presume – very dangerous – that Fraser had sold the land to Ritchie.

8 DECEMBER 1871, Dutoitspan appointed as the seat of magistracy for Pniel District, 1871.
8 DECEMBER 1877, GW Legislative Council disbanded.
8 DECEMBER 1946, Two men killed when their aeroplane crashes at Kimberley Airport.

DID YOU KNOW

In the early days of the diamond fields, Nicholas Waterboer’s territory known as Griqualand West came under the protection, and indeed, was taken over by the British government. The rush of diggers looking for instant wealth saw settlements springing up all along the Vaal river and the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, based at Kenhardt under command of Captain Jackson, were ordered to the diggings to establish and maintain law and order until a permanent police force could be organized. This was complied with but it was only in September 1872 that a proclamation was issued to organize and regulate a police force for Griqualand West (including Kimberley). Many members of the same Frontier police became members of the first police force, including Inspectors McLean, McKenna and O’Connor. On 26 May 1873 a mounted force was organized and named the Griqualand West Mounted Police. Just over a year later the entire force was re-arranged into the following categories: Mounted Police; Town Police (including detectives); Rural police; and the Convict Police (including gaolers, turnkeys, and special constables). Well-known law enforcers at the time were Inspectors G. Percy, O. Back, G. Back and G.R. Bradshaw. Major Maxwell was appointed the Inspector of Prisons.

Kimberley Police in the 1890's - Today in Kimberley's History

Kimberley Police in the 1890’s

In 1880 the mounted police were incorporated into the Cape Mounted Rifles, and later the police in the Cape Colony were organized into Districts, Kimberley becoming the HQ for Cape Police II, the patrol region stretching up to Mahikeng. On 1 January 1913, three years after the Union of the Cape, Orange Free State, Transvaal and Natal, the South African Police came into being.

The Detective Department, active from 1872, had John Larkin Fry as its Chief from 1872 until 1882 when he was re-appointed Chief. He served in that capacity for only three more years before being removed from his post in February 1885 for negligence in keeping the department’s books. Police stations, including satellite stations, were the Headquarters in Transvaal Road (Phakamile Mabija Road), West End, Old De Beers (Gladstone), and Dutoitspan village (later Beaconsfield).

The normal effective strength of the force amounted to 56 officers and men in Kimberley, distributed at the four depots, responsible for the following duties: Barrack guard at each depot, 24 hour town patrols, Magistrate and Police court duties, High Court duty when in session, preservation of “peace and order within the district”, travelling in execution of warrants of arrest, searching for criminals, etc.

Executions in Kimberley were always held in the precincts of the Police Barracks on Transvaal Road, the first execution being held approximately on the corner of Roper Street and Transvaal Road (then known as Giddy Street), later executions up until 1892 took place over the road in the Barracks region now occupied by the Van Heerden buildings. From 1892 executions were held at the Hull Street gaol complex, but by 1927 all executions had been moved to Pretoria Central prison where they occurred until capital punishment was outlawed in terms of the South African Constitution of 1996.

Pictured are some Kimberley police in the 1890s.

From Kimberley Calls and Recalls on Facebook By Steve Lunderstedt

Aeon Computer Kimberley

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