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Golfer Hugh Baiocchi

TODAY IN KIMBERLEY’S HISTORY 01 APRIL

UPDATED: 01/04/2020

1 April 1898, Rhodes becomes a shareholder in the Diamond Fields Advertiser.
1 April 1914, De Beers Director Robert English dies.
1 April 1989, Hugh Baiocchi (pictured) sets a new course record of 63 at the Kimberley golf course.

DIAMOND FIELDS ADVERTISER CHANGES POLICY
Francis Dormer, who became Editor of The Cape Argus newspaper in Cape Town in 1879 was given the opportunity to buy the paper from Saul Solomon, but did not have funds to make the purchase. He approached Cecil Rhodes, who was keen to have a newspaper on his side in his early political career, who agreed to sponsor the venture for £6000, half of which was payable in cash and the balance in instalments.

The transfer was completed on 1 July 1881, and by 1886 Dormer, with the backing of Rhodes and other shareholders, owned the printing works then known as The Argus Printing and Publishing Company of Cape Town, Limited. It is believed that Rhodes was the second largest shareholder of the company behind Dormer himself. Certainly, Rhodes knew the importance of having a newspaper on his side, and he was involved, without a doubt, as a shareholder in Johannesburg’s daily newspaper, The Star, as well as with the Diamond Fields Advertiser in Kimberley. The latter, very much an anti-Rhodes newspaper, changed its policy when it was floated as a company on 1 April 1898, the major shareholders being Frederick St Leger, Ferdinand Schuler and Cecil Rhodes, the latter represented by Dr Rutherfoord Harris.

George Green was appointed Editor at this junction, and would be dubbed ‘The Prince of Journalists’ by Rhodes after the Siege of Kimberley. Green had met with Rhodes for supper shortly after his appointment, and they became friendly. Rhodes said that Green was always accessible and he used to offer him many juicy political tidbits for the newspaper, invariably commenting “I call that a bit of real jam for your newspaper.”

UPDATED: 01/04/2019

1 April 1898, Rhodes becomes a shareholder in the Diamond Fields Advertiser.
1 April 1914, De Beers Director Robert English dies.
1 April 1989, Hugh Baiocchi (pictured) sets a new course record of 63 at the Kimberley golf course.

DID YOU KNOW

Hugh John Baiocchi (born Johannesburg 17 August 1946) is a South African professional golfer who has won more than twenty professional tournaments around the world.

After winning the SA Amateur in 1970, he turned professional in 1971 and spent his regular career playing mainly in Europe. He was a member of the European Tour from its first season in 1972 until 1993 and made the top one hundred on the Order of Merit for the Tour’s first nineteen seasons, including three top ten placings: 1973 (3rd); 1975 (6th) and 1977 (2nd). He won six official money events on the tour. He also competed regularly on the Southern Africa Tour during the Northern Hemisphere winter, winning several tournaments there and winning the Order of Merit in 1973/74 and 1978/79. He won the SA Open Championship in 1979.

As a senior (over 50) golfer, Baiocchi played mainly on the U.S.-based Champions Tour, where he has three wins.
Married to wife Joan and with two children (Lauren and Justin), he lives in Palm Springs, California. His daughter, Lauren, is married to well-known retired baseball player Johnny Bench.

He also designed many golf courses such as the Legend Course at the Constance Belle Mare Plage Resort in Mauritius, venue of the 2011 MCB Tour Championship.

(mostly from Wikipedia).

1 April 1898, Rhodes becomes a shareholder in the Diamond Fields Advertiser.
1 April 1914, De Beers Director Robert English dies.
1 April 1989, Hugh Baiocchi sets a new course record of 63 at the Kimberley course.

PT-Hugh_Baiocchi-1989

Golf icon Hugh Baiocchi and his wife, Joan

DID YOU KNOW

The settlement of Modder River was begun shortly after the railway line reached there in 1885 and by the outbreak of the Anglo-Boer War there were at least six hotels at what had become a weekend destination for Kimberley citizens. The Crown and Royal Hotel (pictured) is the sole surviving hotel.

One of the big battles of the Anglo-Boer War was also fought at the junction of the Modder and Riet rivers on 28 November 1899 – the Battle of Modder River, or as the Boers called it, the Battle of Two Rivers (Tweeriviere). It was at this battle that General Koos de la Rey introduced trenches into the Boer battle plans.

The British army of Lord Methuen camped in the Modder River/Ritchie region from 29 November 1899 until 16 February 1900, although it was used throughout the war as a British outpost.

PT-The_Crown_and_Royal_Hotel-1885

The Crown and Royal Hotel, Modder River

The village of Ritchie, a farming settlement, was originally called The Rosmead, possibly named after Lord Rosmead (Sir Hercules Robinson). In 1881 John Fraser offered plots for sale for the erection of buildings for what he termed “a retreat” for Kimberley folk, and by October 1889 it was called Rosmead Township. By 1912 the village had been renamed Ritchie – as there was already a Rosmead in the Cape – after the farmer who founded the town, one Hendrik Ritchie.

Both Modder River and Ritchie are incorporated into the Sol Plaatje Municipality.

From Kimberley Calls and Recalls on Facebook By Steve Lunderstedt

Aeon Computer Kimberley

About Steve Lunderstedt

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